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About Wood

Project Guide

What kind of project are you about to begin? Cladding on the entire house? Garden furniture? A carport made of cedar wood? A playhouse from larch?

No matter the nature of your project, you can find advice on how to achieve a successful result in this project guide. The guide takes into account the various wood species, different surfaces and the state of the wood.
Facades made of exotic wood, larch and cedar

Larch
Larch has a light, reddish brown colour and clear growth rings. Larch is very resinous, which makes the wood harder than other light wood species.

The light and modern expression along with the expectation of a long durability has made larch very popular over the last few years.

Larch is a light wood species, which is comparable to other light wood species such as e.g. spruce and pine, and therefore it should be treated with a wood preservative against rot and fungi with GORI 11 or GORI 22.

GORI cannot guarantee against black mould attacks and/or peeling on larch, as this is caused by the quality of the wood and not the surface treatment.
New, untreated larch
Clean the wood. Leave to take effect 1-5 days. Scrub with a brush and then rinse with water.

Use GORI 22 wood preservative to obtain deep protection against rot and fungi.

Then apply GORI 38 with a brush. Any surplus oil is wiped off with a lint-free cloth after 15 minutes. The best result is obtained by applying two coats of GORI 38 in a 24-hour interval.

If you want an opaque colour on exotic wood or larch, you may also choose to use GORI 88 or GORI 99 Extreme.
Other wood species
Cedar
Cedar has a beautiful, golden colour, and is especially used for cladding or small buildings such as garages and carports.

Just as other noble wood species, cedar is naturally protected against rot and fungi. Many people therefore do not apply any surface treatment on cedar.

If you do not want your cedar wood to turn grey, you can treat it with GORI Oil. By doing this, you keep and enhance the beautiful, natural glow ow the wood.
 

New, untreated cedar:

Clean with GORI Algae & Moss Remover. Leave to take effect. Scrub with a brush and rinse with water. Apply GORI Oil with a brush. Any excess oil is removed with a lint-free cloth after 15 minutes. The best result is obtained applying two coats with a 24-hour interval.

Cedar does not require wood preservative treatment.

If you want an opaque colour on exotic wood or larch, you may also choose to use GORI 88 or GORI 99 Extreme.
 

Previously treated cedar:
Mould growth is treated with med GORI Algae & Moss Remover.

Remove dust and dirt with GORI Algae & Moss Remover. Scrub with a brush and rinse with clean water. Decayed wood must be sanded down to healthy wood. Apply 1-2 coats of GORI Oil.

If you want an opaque colour on exotic wood or larch, you may also choose to use GORI 88 or GORI 99 Extreme.
Nobel Wood Species
Noble wood is the common term for exotic wood species such as teak, mahogany, merbau and nyatoh. A lot of furniture is made from noble wood, but also windows, doors and cladding can be made of mahogany, teak and similar wood species.

The various noble wood species are very hard and contain natural oils. This means that they are not very absorbent. The noble wood species are also equipped by nature with protection against rot and fungi, which is why these wood species do not need treatment with a wood preservative.
Facades, gables, eaves, garages and others

New wood
Wood Preservative
The wood is ready to be treated with a wood preservative, when it is completely dry, clean and solid.

New, untreated wood must always be treated with a wood preservative before or just after installing it. It is not necessary to use wood preservative on pressure- or vacuum impregnated wood unless the wood has been left unprotected for more than 6 months.

When the wood has been treated with a wood preservative, you need fill holes and cracks with putty or acrylic joint filler. You should not leave primed wood for more than two weeks before applying the final treatment.

Exotic wood species such as e.g. teak and mahogany are naturally protected against rot and fungi, and you do not need to use wood preservative of this type of wood.
 
 

How to choose wood preservative


There are two kinds of wood preservatives: Water based and solvent based. The choice between the two is a matter of habit.

As a rule, we recommend that you choose a water based wood preservative such as GORI 11, if you are going to apply an acryl-based topcoat, and an oil based wood preservative as GORI 22, if you are going to apply an oil based topcoat.
Preparation
New, untreated wood should not be left too long without treatment. In fact, the natural degradation of the starts the very first day the wood is left untreated, outdoors.

In addition, even if you just bought the wood, it may not come straight from an indoor warehouse – it could have been left outside for a long time at the lumberyard.

If the wood looks grey and dull, and has loose fibres, it could be a sign that it is not completely new wood. If this is the case, it may be necessary to treat the wood in the same way that you treat previously treated wood.

New wood could be infected by fungal spores, which are not visible to the naked eye. To remove this you can use GORI Fjern Belægninger to prevent or slow down growth of non-visible attacks.
 
 

Four things you need to observe about new, untreated wood



1. Resin flowing from the wood or knots must be scraped off. The area must be wiped with a cloth moistened with alcohol.

Resin flowing from wood Resin flowing from wood.

2. If the wood already has incrustations, it should be treated with GORI Algae & Moss Remover.

Black mould on wood Black mould on wood.

3. The wood must be cleaned to remove dirt with GORI Algae & Moss Remover.

Normal dirt on new wood. Normal dirt on new wood.

4. Before further treatment, a wooden surface should be clean, dry and solid. This is vital in order for the wood protection to adhere to and penetrate into the wood. On new wood, there are often loose wood fibres on the surface:

Loose wood fibres are clearly seen
On this piece of wood, the loose wood fibres are clearly seen.

You can check the wood surface by carrying out a tape test, when the wood is dry. This is what you do: Take 30 cm of tape. Place the 20 cm on the wood and use the last 10 cm to hold the tape. Rub the tape thoroughly against the wood with your nails and leave it for one minute:

Make sure you rub the tape well onto the wood surface.
Make sure you rub the tape well onto the wood surface.

Tear off the tape in one quick movement. If there are wood fibres on the back of the tape, the wood has not been cleaned or sanded sufficiently:

There are many loose wood fibres on the tape.
There are many loos wood fibres on the tape. This wooden surface has not been cleaned or planed sufficiently.
Final treatment
On new wood, you will obtain the longest durability and the best-looking result with an acrylic based, opaque wood protection such as GORI 99 Extreme. The product follows the wood’s movements and provides a wear-resistant and beautiful surface. GORI 99 Extreme is based on the Active Protection.

If you would like to use a translucent wood protection, we recommend GORI 88 Transparent.

No matter which product you choose, you must apply at least two coats of wood protection in order to obtain a suitable layer thickness End grain and particularly exposed surfaces should always be given an extra coat. The layer thickness is extremely important for the protection and the final visual result.

Do not apply wood protection in direct sunlight – this will make the product dry too quickly and the result will be visible stripes or granulated.

As a rule, translucent wood protection must be applied with a brush in order to get an even result. When you apply opaque wood protection, there are several choices, which however, depend of the project: On rough wood, you can use both roller and brush. On planed wood, we recommend brush or short-piled roller.
Previously treated wood
Wood Preservative
The wood should not be treated with a wood preservative until it is completely clean, dry and solid.

Previously treated wooden surfaces should only be treated with a wood preservative on areas, where the wood protection has been worn off completely. When you have checked the health of the wood and repaired/replaced any damaged wood, you must remove the peeling paint/wood protection and then apply wood preservative on these areas.

When the wood has been treated with a wood preservative, you should fill cracks and holes with putty or acrylic joint filler. Primed wood should not be left for more than 2 weeks before applying finial treatment.

Exotic wood species as e.g. teak and mahogany are naturally protected against rot and fungi, and you do not need to use wood preservative.
 
 

How to choose wood preservative


There are two kinds of wood preservatives: Water based and solvent based. The choice between the two is a matter of habit.

As a rule, we recommend that you choose a water based wood preservative such as GORI 11, if you are going to apply an acryl-based topcoat, and an oil based wood preservative as GORI 22, if you are going to apply an oil based topcoat.
Preparation
If the wood protection looks worn down, and has started peeling, it is time to protect the wood again.

Check the wood for any defects. When these have been mended, you must remove loose paint, wood protection and/or loose fibres with a scraper, sand paper or a sander. Remove dirt with GORI Algae & Moss Remover.

When the wood is dry, the surface must be sanded. Now you have given your wood the best conditions for the adhesion of the wood protection on the wood surface.
 
 

Four things you need to check on previously treated wood



1. Decayed wood must be replaced

Decayed wood. Decayed wood.

2. Water traps must be remedied, so that water is led away from the wood. This is done by making a glazing bead or a gradient on horizontal surfaces.

Water trap. Example of water trap.

3. If the wood already has incrustations, it must be treated with GORI Algae & Moss Remover.

Mould attack. Mould attack.

4. Before further treatment, a wooden surface should be clean, dry and solid. This is vital in order for the wood protection to adhere to and penetrate into the wood. On new wood, there are often loose wood fibres on the surface:

You can check the wood surface by carrying out a tape test, when the wood is dry. This is what you do: Take 30 cm of tape. Place the 20 cm on the wood and use the last 10 cm to hold the tape. Rub the tape thoroughly against the wood with your nails and leave it for one minute:

Make sure you rub the tape well onto the wood surface.
Make sure you rub the tape well onto the wood surface.

Tear off the tape in one quick movement. If there are wood fibres on the back of the tape, the wood has not been cleaned or sanded sufficiently:

There are many loose wood fibres on the tape.
There are many loose wood fibres on the tape. This wooden surface has not been cleaned or planed sufficiently.
Final treatment
On new wood, you will obtain the longest durability and the best-looking result with an acrylic based, opaque wood protection such as GORI 99 Extreme. The product follows the wood’s movements and provides a wear-resistant and beautiful surface. GORI 99 Extreme is based on the Active Protection.

If you would like to use a translucent wood protection, we recommend GORI 88 Transparent.

No matter which product you choose, you must apply at least two coats of wood protection in order to obtain a suitable layer thickness End grain and particularly exposed surfaces should always be given an extra coat. The layer thickness is extremely important for the protection and the final visual result.

Do not apply wood protection in direct sunlight – this will make the product dry too quickly and the result will be visible stripes or granulated.

As a rule, translucent wood protection must be applied with a brush in order to get an even result. When you apply opaque wood protection, there are several choices, which however, depend of the project: On rough wood, you can use both roller and brush. On planed wood, we recommend brush or short-piled roller.
Garden Furniture

New or previous treated wood
Preparation
Garden furniture, which is left outside during the summer, is exposed to both sun and rain. In order to protect the furniture it needs regular treatment in order to maintain the original glow of the wood.

New, untreated wood should not be left for too long without treatment. In fact, the natural degradation of the starts the very first day the wood is left untreated outdoors.

If the garden furniture have incrustations, you must treat them with GORI Power Cleaner or GORI Furniture Refresher.

New wood may be infected by fungal spores, which are not visible to the naked eye. To remove this you can use GORI Algae & Moss Remover to prevent or slow down growth of non-visible attacks.

Normal dirt and dust should be removed with GORI Power Cleaner. Loose fibres must be removed by sanding or using a sanding sponge, when you clean the furniture.

Garden furniture should not be treated with a wood preservative.
Final treatment
When the garden furniture is completely dry, apply GORI 36 two times with an interval of 24 hours. This gives you the best and most durable result. Excess oil, which has not been absorbed after app. 15 minutes, is wiped off with a lint-free cloth.

Repeated treatments with GORI 36 will make the furniture darker. To avoid this, you can mix a tinted product with a clear 1:1 – then the wood will not darken as quickly. However, you should never use the colourless as final treatment.
Fences, carports, pergolas, etc

Previously treated wood
Wood Preservative
The wood should not be treated with a wood preservative until it is completely clean, dry and solid.

Previously treated wooden surfaces should only be treated with a wood preservative on areas, where the wood protection has been worn off completely. When you have checked the health of the wood and repaired/replaced any damaged wood, you must remove the peeling paint/wood protection and then apply wood preservative on these areas.

When the wood has been treated with a wood preservative, you should fill cracks and holes with putty or acrylic joint filler. Primed wood should not be left for more than 2 weeks before applying finial treatment.

Exotic wood species as e.g. teak and mahogany are naturally protected against rot and fungi, and you do not need to use wood preservative.
 
 

How to choose wood preservative


There are two kinds of wood preservatives: Water based and solvent based. The choice between the two is a matter of habit.

As a rule, we recommend that you choose a water based wood preservative such as GORI 11, if you are going to apply an acryl-based topcoat, and an oil based wood preservative as GORI 22, if you are going to apply an oil based topcoat.

If you want a solvent-based product, we recommend GORI 88, which is a solvent-based wood protection, available in both opaque and translucent colours.

If you want a quick and easy wood protection for your fence, carport, etc., we recommend GORI 44 Transparent.

Regardless of your choice of product, the wood needs at least two coats in order to obtain a good layer thickness. End grain and other exposed surfaces must always be given an extra coat. The layer thickness is very important in relation to protection and the final visual result.

Do not apply wood protection in direct sunlight – this will make the product dry too quickly and the result will be visible stripes or granulated.

Click here to read more about temperature, humidity and the wood moisture, when you apply wood protection.

As a rule, translucent wood protection must be applied with a brush in order to get an even result. When you apply opaque wood protection, there are several choices, which however, depend of the project: On rough wood, you can use both roller and brush. On planed wood, we recommend brush or short-piled roller.
Preparation
If the wood protection looks worn down, and has started peeling, it is time to protect the wood again.

Check the wood for any defects. When these have been mended, you must remove loose paint, wood protection and/or loose fibres with a scraper, sand paper or a sander. Remove dirt with GORI Algae & Moss Remover.

When the wood is dry, the surface must be sanded. Now you have given your wood the best conditions for the adhesion of the wood protection on the wood surface.
 
 

Four things you need to check on previously treated wood



1. Decayed wood must be replaced

Decayed wood. Decayed wood.

2. Water traps must be remedied, so that water is led away from the wood. This is done by making a glazing bead or a gradient on horizontal surfaces.

Water trap. Example of water trap.

3. If the wood already has incrustations, it must be treated with GORI Fjern Belægninger or GORI Algae & Moss Remover.

Mould attack. Mould attack.

4. Before further treatment, a wooden surface should be clean, dry and solid. This is vital in order for the wood protection to adhere to and penetrate into the wood. On new wood, there are often loose wood fibres on the surface:

You can check the wood surface by carrying out a tape test, when the wood is dry. This is what you do: Take 30 cm of tape. Place the 20 cm on the wood and use the last 10 cm to hold the tape. Rub the tape thoroughly against the wood with your nails and leave it for one minute:

Make sure you rub the tape well onto the wood surface.
Make sure you rub the tape well onto the wood surface.

Tear off the tape in one quick movement. If there are wood fibres on the back of the tape, the wood has not been cleaned or sanded sufficiently:

There are many loose wood fibres on the tape.
There are many loose wood fibres on the tape. This wooden surface has not been cleaned or planed sufficiently.
Final Treatment
On new wood, you will obtain the longest durability and the best-looking result with an acrylic based, opaque wood protection such as GORI 99 Extreme. The product follows the wood’s movements and provides a wear-resistant and beautiful surface. GORI 99 Extreme is based on the Active Protection.

If you would like to use a translucent wood protection, we recommend GORI 88 Transparent.

No matter which product you choose, you must apply at least two coats of wood protection in order to obtain a suitable layer thickness End grain and particularly exposed surfaces should always be given an extra coat. The layer thickness is extremely important for the protection and the final visual result.

Do not apply wood protection in direct sunlight – this will make the product dry too quickly and the result will be visible stripes or granulated.

As a rule, translucent wood protection must be applied with a brush in order to get an even result. When you apply opaque wood protection, there are several choices, which however, depend of the project: On rough wood, you can use both roller and brush. On planed wood, we recommend brush or short-piled roller.
New wood
Wood Preservative
The wood is ready to be treated with a wood preservative, when it is completely dry, clean and solid.

New, untreated wood must always be treated with a wood preservative before or just after installing it. It is not necessary to use wood preservative on pressure- or vacuum impregnated wood unless the wood has been left unprotected for more than 6 months.

When the wood has been treated with a wood preservative, you need fill holes and cracks with putty or acrylic joint filler. You should not leave primed wood for more than two weeks before applying the final treatment.

Exotic wood species such as e.g. teak and mahogany are naturally protected against rot and fungi, and you do not need to use wood preservative of this type of wood.
 
 

How to choose wood preservative


There are two kinds of wood preservatives: Water based and solvent based. The choice between the two is a matter of habit.

As a rule, we recommend that you choose a water based wood preservative such as GORI 11, if you are going to apply an acryl-based topcoat, and an oil based wood preservative as GORI 22, if you are going to apply an oil based topcoat.
Preparation
New, untreated wood should not be left too long without treatment. In fact, the natural degradation of the starts the very first day the wood is left untreated, outdoors.

In addition, even if you just bought the wood, it may not come straight from an indoor warehouse – it could have been left outside for a long time at the lumberyard.

If the wood looks grey and dull, and has loose fibres, it could be a sign that it is not completely new wood. If this is the case, it may be necessary to treat the wood in the same way that you treat previously treated wood.

New wood could be infected by fungal spores, which are not visible to the naked eye. To remove this you can use GORI Algae & Moss Remover to prevent or slow down growth of non-visible attacks.
 
 

Four things you need to observe about new, untreated wood



1. Resin flowing from the wood or knots must be scraped off. The area must be wiped with a cloth moistened with alcohol.

Resin flowing from wood Resin flowing from wood.

2. If the wood already has incrustations, it should be treated with GORI Algae & Moss Remover.

Black mould on wood Black mould on wood.

3. The wood must be cleaned to remove dirt. This can be done with GORI Algae & Moss Remover.

Normal dirt on new wood. Normal dirt on new wood.

4. Before further treatment, a wooden surface should be clean, dry and solid. This is vital in order for the wood protection to adhere to and penetrate into the wood. On new wood, there are often loose wood fibres on the surface:

Loose wood fibres are clearly seen
On this piece of wood, the loose wood fibres are clearly seen.

You can check the wood surface by carrying out a tape test, when the wood is dry. This is what you do: Take 30 cm of tape. Place the 20 cm on the wood and use the last 10 cm to hold the tape. Rub the tape thoroughly against the wood with your nails and leave it for one minute:

Make sure you rub the tape well onto the wood surface.
Make sure you rub the tape well onto the wood surface.

Tear off the tape in one quick movement. If there are wood fibres on the back of the tape, the wood has not been cleaned or sanded sufficiently:

There are many loose wood fibres on the tape.
There are many loos wood fibres on the tape. This wooden surface has not been cleaned or planed sufficiently.
Final treatment
On new wood, you will obtain the longest durability and the best-looking result with an acrylic based, opaque wood protection such as GORI 99 Extreme. The product follows the wood’s movements and provides a wear-resistant and beautiful surface. GORI 99 Extreme is based on the Active Protection.

If you would like to use a translucent wood protection, we recommend GORI 88 Transparent.

No matter which product you choose, you must apply at least two coats of wood protection in order to obtain a suitable layer thickness End grain and particularly exposed surfaces should always be given an extra coat. The layer thickness is extremely important for the protection and the final visual result.

Do not apply wood protection in direct sunlight – this will make the product dry too quickly and the result will be visible stripes or granulated.

As a rule, translucent wood protection must be applied with a brush in order to get an even result. When you apply opaque wood protection, there are several choices, which however, depend of the project: On rough wood, you can use both roller and brush. On planed wood, we recommend brush or short-piled roller.
Wooden Decks

New wood
Wood preservative
The wood is ready to be treated with a wood preservative, when it is completely dry, clean and solid.

New, untreated wood must always be treated with a wood preservative before or just after installing it. It is not necessary to use wood preservative on pressure- or vacuum impregnated wood unless the wood has been left unprotected for more than 6 months.

When the wood has been treated with a wood preservative, you need fill holes and cracks with putty or acrylic joint filler. You should not leave primed wood for more than two weeks before applying the final treatment.

Exotic wood species such as e.g. teak and mahogany are naturally protected against rot and fungi, and you do not need to use wood preservative of this type of wood.
 
 

How to choose wood preservative


There are two kinds of wood preservatives: Water based and solvent based. The choice between the two is a matter of habit.

As a rule, we recommend that you choose a water based wood preservative such as GORI 11, if you are going to apply an acryl-based topcoat, and an oil based wood preservative as GORI 22, if you are going to apply an oil based topcoat.
Preparation
New, untreated wood should not be left too long without treatment. In fact, the natural degradation of the starts the very first day the wood is left untreated, outdoors.

In addition, even if you just bought the wood, it may not come straight from an indoor warehouse – it could have been left outside for a long time at the lumberyard.

If the wood looks grey and dull, and has loose fibres, it could be a sign that it is not completely new wood. If this is the case, it may be necessary to treat the wood in the same way that you treat previously treated wood.

New wood could be infected by fungal spores, which are not visible to the naked eye. To remove this you can use GORI Algae & Moss Remover to prevent or slow down growth of non-visible attacks.
 
 

Four things you need to observe about new, untreated wood



1. Resin flowing from the wood or knots must be scraped off. The area must be wiped with a cloth moistened with alcohol.

Resin flowing from wood Resin flowing from wood.

2. If the wood already has incrustations, it should be treated with GORI Algae & Moss Remover.

Black mould on wood Black mould on wood.

3. The wood must be cleaned to remove dirt. This can be done with GORI Algae & Moss Remover.

Normal dirt on new wood. Normal dirt on new wood.

4. Before further treatment, a wooden surface should be clean, dry and solid. This is vital in order for the wood protection to adhere to and penetrate into the wood. On new wood, there are often loose wood fibres on the surface:

Loose wood fibres are clearly seen
On this piece of wood, the loose wood fibres are clearly seen.

You can check the wood surface by carrying out a tape test, when the wood is dry. This is what you do: Take 30 cm of tape. Place the 20 cm on the wood and use the last 10 cm to hold the tape. Rub the tape thoroughly against the wood with your nails and leave it for one minute:

Make sure you rub the tape well onto the wood surface.
Make sure you rub the tape well onto the wood surface.

Tear off the tape in one quick movement. If there are wood fibres on the back of the tape, the wood has not been cleaned or sanded sufficiently:

There are many loose wood fibres on the tape.
There are many loos wood fibres on the tape. This wooden surface has not been cleaned or planed sufficiently.
Final treatment
A wooden deck is horizontal. Therefore, it is especially exposed to dirt and wear and at the same time, it is constantly exposed to sun and water.

In order to keep a wooden deck healthy and nice to look at, it must be treated more often than other woodwork. You must expect to treat your wooden deck every year.

As final treatment, the best result is obtained by using GORI 37 or GORI 38. Both products penetrate deep into the wood, adds glow and provide a beautiful result, while also slowing down the growth of mould and fungi on the surface.

Repeated treatments with decking oil will make the deck darker. To avoid this, you can mix a tinted product with a clear 1:1 – then the wood will not darken as quickly. However, you should never use the colourless as final treatment.
Windows and doors

Previously treated wood
Wood preservative
The wood is ready to be treated with a wood preservative, when it is completely dry, clean and solid.

New, untreated wood must always be treated with a wood preservative before or just after installing it. It is not necessary to use wood preservative on pressure- or vacuum impregnated wood unless the wood has been left unprotected for more than 6 months.

When the wood has been primed, you need fill holes and cracks with putty or acrylic joint filler. You should not leave primed wood for more than two weeks before applying the final treatment.

Exotic wood species such as e.g. teak and mahogany are protected against rot and fungi by nature and you do not need to use wood preservative of this type of wood.
 
 

How to choose wood preservative


There are two kinds of wood preservatives: Water based and solvent based. The choice between the two is a matter of habit.

As a rule, we recommend that you choose a water based wood preservative such as GORI 11, if you are going to apply an acryl-based topcoat, and an oil based wood preservative as GORI 22, if you are going to apply an oil based topcoat.
Preparation
If the wood protection looks worn down, and has started peeling, it is time to protect the wood again.

Check the wood for any defects. When these have been mended, you must remove loose paint, wood protection and/or loose fibres with a scraper, sand paper or a sander. Remove dirt with GORI Algae & Moss Remover.

When the wood is dry, the surface must be sanded. Now you have given your wood the best conditions for the adhesion of the wood protection on the wood surface.
 
 

Four things you need to check on previously treated wood



1. Decayed wood must be replaced

Decayed wood. Decayed wood.

2. Water traps must be remedied, so that water is led away from the wood. This is done by making a glazing bead or a gradient on horizontal surfaces.

Water trap. Example of water trap.

3. If the wood already has incrustations, it must be treated with GORI Algae & Moss Remover.

Mould attack. Mould attack.

4. Before further treatment, a wooden surface should be clean, dry and solid. This is vital in order for the wood protection to adhere to and penetrate into the wood. On new wood, there are often loose wood fibres on the surface:

You can check the wood surface by carrying out a tape test, when the wood is dry. This is what you do: Take 30 cm of tape. Place the 20 cm on the wood and use the last 10 cm to hold the tape. Rub the tape thoroughly against the wood with your nails and leave it for one minute:

Make sure you rub the tape well onto the wood surface.
Make sure you rub the tape well onto the wood surface.

Tear off the tape in one quick movement. If there are wood fibres on the back of the tape, the wood has not been cleaned or sanded sufficiently:

There are many loose wood fibres on the tape.
There are many loose wood fibres on the tape. This wooden surface has not been cleaned or planed sufficiently.
Final Treatment
The best and most durable wood protection for windows and doors is GORI 88 or GORI 99 Extreme, which is our opaque wood protection for windows.

Please note that gazing beads, sealant tape and bottom panel are extremely exposed to rain. If the sealant tape or the putty is loose or defective, water can penetrate into the wood. Then the wood protection will start peeling, and the conditions for rot are present. Therefore, you need to repair lists and sealant tape before you apply wood protection.

Condensation on the inside of windows could mean that there is a lack of ventilation/airing in the house. Always make sure that the bottom of the window has an outward gradient, so water is led away. Water may also accumulate in cracks and holes, so these should be filled.

If you want to treat your noble wood windows and doors with a translucent wood protection, we recommend using GORI 88.
New wood
Wood preservative
The wood is ready to be treated with a wood preservative, when it is completely dry, clean and solid.

New, untreated wood must always be treated with a wood preservative before or just after installing it. It is not necessary to use wood preservative on pressure- or vacuum impregnated wood unless the wood has been left unprotected for more than 6 months.

When the wood has been treated with a wood preservative, you need fill holes and cracks with putty or acrylic joint filler. You should not leave primed wood for more than two weeks before applying the final treatment.

Exotic wood species such as e.g. teak and mahogany are naturally protected against rot and fungi, and you do not need to use wood preservative of this type of wood.
 
 

How to choose wood preservative


There are two kinds of wood preservatives: Water based and solvent based. The choice between the two is a matter of habit.

As a rule, we recommend that you choose a water based wood preservative such as GORI 11, if you are going to apply an acryl-based topcoat, and an oil based wood preservative as GORI 22, if you are going to apply an oil based topcoat.
Preparation
New, untreated wood should not be left too long without treatment. In fact, the natural degradation of the starts the very first day the wood is left untreated, outdoors.

In addition, even if you just bought the wood, it may not come straight from an indoor warehouse – it could have been left outside for a long time at the lumberyard.

If the wood looks grey and dull, and has loose fibres, it could be a sign that it is not completely new wood. If this is the case, it may be necessary to treat the wood in the same way that you treat previously treated wood.

New wood could be infected by fungal spores, which are not visible to the naked eye. To remove this you can use GORI Algae & Moss Remover to prevent or slow down growth of non-visible attacks.
 
 

Four things you need to observe about new, untreated wood



1. Resin flowing from the wood or knots must be scraped off. The area must be wiped with a cloth moistened with alcohol.

Resin flowing from wood Resin flowing from wood.

2. If the wood already has incrustations, it should be treated with GORI Algae & Moss Remover.

Black mould on wood Black mould on wood.

3. The wood must be cleaned to remove dirt. This can be done with GORI Algae & Moss Remover.

Normal dirt on new wood. Normal dirt on new wood.

4. Before further treatment, a wooden surface should be clean, dry and solid. This is vital in order for the wood protection to adhere to and penetrate into the wood. On new wood, there are often loose wood fibres on the surface:

Loose wood fibres are clearly seen
On this piece of wood, the loose wood fibres are clearly seen.

You can check the wood surface by carrying out a tape test, when the wood is dry. This is what you do: Take 30 cm of tape. Place the 20 cm on the wood and use the last 10 cm to hold the tape. Rub the tape thoroughly against the wood with your nails and leave it for one minute:

Make sure you rub the tape well onto the wood surface.
Make sure you rub the tape well onto the wood surface.

Tear off the tape in one quick movement. If there are wood fibres on the back of the tape, the wood has not been cleaned or sanded sufficiently:

There are many loose wood fibres on the tape.
There are many loos wood fibres on the tape. This wooden surface has not been cleaned or planed sufficiently.
Final treatment
Protecting wooden windows and doors is often quite a project. If you do the work correctly, it will be many years, before you have to do it again.

The best and most durable protection for windows and doors is carried out with is GORI 88 or GORI 99 Extreme.

Make sure that the bottom panel of the window has an outward gradient, so water is led away from the window. Water may also accumulate in cracks and holes, so these must be filled.

If you want to treat windows made of noble wood with a translucent wood protection, we recommend is GORI 88.